‘Personal’ memories are easier to recall than other details. Here’s why.

I’ve always been fascinated by how vividly we remember some memories, while others  fade away into oblivion. For example, I can still remember every detail of my first day at school – from the smell of chalk dust to the sound of pencils scratching on paper. Yet, I struggle to remember what I had for lunch yesterday.

It turns out I’m not that unusual. The human brain is wired to prioritise and recall some “episodic memories” more easily than other details. I recently came across a study in the Journal of Neuroscience that sheds light on why this happens.

It describes a study done by the French National Center for Scientific Research. The study showed that the hippocampus plays a crucial role in organising distinct moments of experience when people learn.  For example, ‘time cells’ in the hippocampus fire when you’re learning a new task, creating a record of the time flow during the task. This helps you remember not just what happened, but also where and when it happened.

 

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So, why are personal memories easier to recall? The study suggests that your brain prioritises the encoding of time and context. This is probably because it helps you create a coherent narrative of your life. By understanding how time cells work, researchers hope to unlock the secrets of memory formation and retrieval.

This study opens up new avenues for exploring memory and could have significant implications for memory-related disorders in the future. Plus, it just might have implications for trainers, teachers and educators. If you want to learn more about this research, you can find the source article here.

This article summary was created by Eleanor Shakiba

Eleanor is a leadership trainer, success coach and people skills expert. She helps managers and business owners build thriving teams and organisations, using tools from Positive Psychology. She's trained more than 60,000 people during her career as a corporate trainer and professional development consultant. Her mission is inspiring talented people to become leaders who make a difference. 

 

No motivation? Here’s why

Most people occasionally experience a lack of motivation. It’s natural to lose interest in a task or project, but what drives this loss of motivation? According to leading psychologists, rewards largely influence your desire to accomplish things. Receiving an internal or external reward helps keep people motivated.

So, what type of reward works best for motivation? The answer depends on the type of motivation. In psychology, motivation is either intrinsic or extrinsic. A recent article on verywellmind.com perfectly explains how rewards impact both types of motivation.

First, it’s important to understand the differences between intrinsic and extrinsic motivation. Intrinsic motivation is internally rewarding. It comes from behaviour that is mostly driven by your self-satisfaction instead of an external reward.

Activities that you engage in for fun are examples of intrinsic motivation. Hobbies are commonly intrinsically motivated. The self-satisfaction that you get from the activity is rewarding enough. Research suggests that adding external rewards on top of internal rewards decreases motivation. Psychologists call this the “over-justification effect”. Your intrinsic enjoyment of a task is sufficient justification for completing it. Adding an external reward creates the perception that the task is over-justified.

Extrinsic motivation comes from a desire to gain external rewards or avoid repercussions. You show up to work to earn money, which is an external reward. If you take away your pay, you’ll likely lack the motivation to go to the office.

However, your performance is also influenced by a variety of intrinsic factors. You likely gain a sense of satisfaction when others recognise your hard work. You may also find completing a challenging work task intrinsically rewarding,

Motivation and self-confidence are closely linked. If you tend to suffer from imposter syndrome, your motivation could be to blame. Self-motivation gives you the drive to set and complete goals. Without this motivation, you may gradually lose confidence in your ability to get things done. Listing the ways that you find your work intrinsically rewarding can boost your motivation in the workplace.

A lack of confidence can also significantly lower your motivation. Without confidence, it’s more of a challenge to stay motivated. Luckily, it’s possible to increase both your motivation and confidence. Choosing the right reward system can boost your motivation to complete tasks. The more you accomplish the more your confidence in your abilities grows.

Building true confidence requires motivation. Based on the article discussed, a reward system is a powerful tool for becoming more motivated. Yet, motivation is only part of the equation for gaining confidence. Neuro-linguistic programming offers a way to reframe your thought patterns, including the way that you think about motivation. Learn how to beat imposter syndrome with my one-to-one coaching and online courses at https://thinklearnsucceed.com.au.

 

 

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What causes narcissists to be spiteful: no, it isn’t you!

Are narcissists truly mean, competitive and jealous? In the article “What Makes Some Narcissists Mean, Competitive and Jealous” posted in Psychology Today, readers are provided with a comprehensive overview of the phenomenon of narcissism. The article delves into the psychological development of narcissists and reveals the factors that contribute to their behaviours. The article explains that most severe narcissists had likely suffered from emotional trauma during a crucial developmental period, which resulted in their self-centred traits. Furthermore, it is revealed that these individuals do not have an awareness of boundaries when they become triggered, meaning they will do anything to get what they want.

The implications of this kind of behaviour are particularly relevant to managers, business owners and supervisors who must work with narcissistic employees or colleagues. Not only is it important for these professionals to understand that their team member’s narcissistic tendencies stem from a deeper-seated issue, but also be aware of how such issues can manifest in workplace interactions. For example, how some narcissists may act out through manipulative tactics or become overly controlling and aggressive when in positions of power. It is important for employers to be able to recognise these warning signs before allowing someone’s ego to take control and destroy morale or productivity in the workplace.

In addition to outlining the causes and effects of narcissistic behaviour, the article provides tips on how leaders can effectively manage such individuals in their teams without damaging relationships or imposing further stress on them due to their underlying condition. These tips include providing consistent feedback on performance as well as finding ways for them to develop emotionally so as not to trigger any potential flare ups due to unresolved past issues. Additionally, leaders should strive for clear communication within teams so as to avoid misunderstandings which can lead to unnecessary confrontations between members; something which narcissists may often initiate when feeling threatened or unappreciated..

 

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In addition to outlining the causes and effects of narcissistic behaviour, the article provides tips on how leaders can effectively manage such individuals in their teams without damaging relationships or imposing further stress on them due to their underlying condition. These tips include providing consistent feedback on performance as well as finding ways for them to develop emotionally so as not to trigger any potential flare ups due to unresolved past issues. Additionally, leaders should strive for clear communication within teams so as to avoid misunderstandings which can lead to unnecessary confrontations between members; something which narcissists may often initiate when feeling threatened or unappreciated.

It is clear that understanding the dynamics behind narcissistic behaviours is paramount if we are looking towards creating healthy working environments free from unnecessary conflict or strain caused by egos run wild.  Although it is important to remember that nothing can replace professional therapy for those who may struggle with the emotional trauma associated with their particular condition.  By becoming cognisant of these issues, leaders can not only help protect themselves from potential liabilities but also create a safe environment in which team members can work together in harmony.

Find out more in the original article here: https://www.psychologytoday.com/intl/blog/insight-is-2020/201807/what-makes-some-narcissists-mean-competitive-and-jealous

This article summary was created by Eleanor Shakiba

Eleanor is a leadership trainer, success coach and people skills expert. She helps managers and business owners build thriving teams and organisations, using tools from Positive Psychology. She's trained more than 60,000 people during her career as a corporate trainer and professional development consultant. Her mission is inspiring talented people to become leaders who make a difference. 

 

The science of confidence

Do you feel like you could use a little more confidence in your life? Are you looking for ways to boost your self-esteem? If so, you’re in luck. According to this article in Psychology Today, there is a lot you can do to increase your confidence. It outlines some of the key findings from recent research on confidence.

One of the most important things to remember about confidence is that it is not a static trait. It can change over time, and it can be affected by our environment and our experiences. For example, you may be confident in one area of our lives but not in others. Our level of confidence can also vary from day to day.

There are many factors that influence our confidence levels, including our genes and our early experiences. However, there are also things that you can do to boost our confidence levels. Some of these include:

  • Practising self-compassion
  • Focusing on our strengths
  • Putting ourselves in challenging situations
  • Thinking positively about ourselves

These are just a few of the things that you can do to increase our confidence levels. If you want to boost your employees’ confidence, you need to find a way to tap into their individual motivations. For younger employees, it may be enough to praise their efforts and congratulate them on their accomplishments. For older employees, it may be more effective to focus on their strengths and give them specific instructions on what you would like them to do. The bottom line is that confidence is something that you can all work on, and it’s worth the effort.

 

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Confidence is essential for success in any field, but especially in business. A lack of confidence can hold you back from achieving our goals and reaching our full potential. Supervisors, managers, and business owners would do well to learn what makes people confident and how they can encourage their employees or team members to be more confident. Confidence is contagious; when someone feels confident, it rubs off on those around them.

For example, if you want to increase your competence, you can learn new skills or practice regularly. If you want to increase your power, you can start taking on more leadership roles or set challenging goals for yourself. If you want to increase your warmth, you can become more social and develop better relationships. And if you want to increase your connection, you can become more involved in your community or join a networking group.

Find out more in the original article here: https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/communication-central/201005/the-science-confidence

This article summary was created by Eleanor Shakiba

Eleanor is a leadership trainer, success coach and people skills expert. She helps managers and business owners build thriving teams and organisations, using tools from Positive Psychology. She's trained more than 60,000 people during her career as a corporate trainer and professional development consultant. Her mission is inspiring talented people to become leaders who make a difference. 

 

Surprising ways nostalgia is good for us

Are the toughest challenges in life really within our own minds? This question is a common theme throughout the 10 Ways You’re Stronger Than You Think article from Psychology Today. In this piece, the author examines the power of nostalgia and how it can help people overcome self-doubt and build resilience. It argues that by recalling happy memories and moments of joy, we can tap into personal strengths that have been lying dormant, allowing us to face difficult situations with greater strength and courage.

Exploring what nostalgia is, outlining its definition as a sentimental yearning for the past or feelings of longing for an idealised past. The writer goes on to explain how nostalgia has been proven to be helpful in difficult times, providing a sense of meaning and purpose through remembering pleasant memories.  It highlights the science behind the power of nostalgia, and explains how it can help us build our resilience.

The article also examines the importance of self-affirmation in challenging times, arguing that by recognising our personal strengths we can better cope with difficult situations. It looks at how we can use affirmations to remind ourselves of our worth and potential

The writer then dives into 10 ways that people can use nostalgia to strengthen themselves; these include focusing on previous successes, cultivating positive relationships, revisiting past hobbies and interests, creating a positive environment and seeking out support from family and friends.

Managers, business owners and supervisors who often find themselves facing numerous challenges on a daily basis. By using the strategies discussed in this piece, leaders can tap into their hidden reserves of strength in order to better cope with uncertainty or fear during tough times. Additionally, they can draw upon happy memories which will provide them with comfort while helping them remain focused on their goals despite any obstacles they may face along the way.

 

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This empowering program offers guidance on how to use one’s own experiences as fuel for personal growth. It provides tools for building resilience so that individuals can face present struggles with confidence knowing that they have overcome similar hardships before.

In summary, 10 Ways You’re Stronger Than You Think is an inspiring article which explores how nostalgia can give us access to untapped reserves of strength when we need it most. The strategies outlined offer practical advice which is especially useful for managers, business owners and supervisors looking for ways to cope with challenging circumstances while remaining focused on their goals despite any obstacles they may encounter along their journey.

Find out more in the original article here: https://www.psychologytoday.com/au/articles/202203/10-ways-youre-stronger-than-you-think

This article summary was created by Eleanor Shakiba

Eleanor is a leadership trainer, success coach and people skills expert. She helps managers and business owners build thriving teams and organisations, using tools from Positive Psychology. She's trained more than 60,000 people during her career as a corporate trainer and professional development consultant. Her mission is inspiring talented people to become leaders who make a difference. 

 

Switch on your confident mind today

Are destructive thoughts keeping you from achieving your goals? If you’re like most people, you may worry about responsibilities or what other people think of you. These thoughts can destroy confidence and leave you feeling helpless. With the right steps, you can learn to switch on your confident mind.

A recent article on Psychology Today from Joel Minden PhD offers several effective tips for building more confidence. The suggestions include the use of evidence-based cognitive and behavioural strategies. You can use any of these techniques to keep your mind from playing tricks on you. First, Minden suggests that you restructure exaggerations. This works best when you tend to overstate the negative aspects of your experiences.

For example, if you tend to assume the worst, you’re exaggerating the situation. Restructuring exaggerations requires you to pay attention to your negative thoughts. When a negative thought arises, question it. Try to provide evidence for and against your negative thoughts. You may also want to try evaluating the situation from someone else’s perspective. After analysing your negative thoughts, you’re more likely to see things more realistically.

Restructuring exaggerations doesn’t work for every situation. Sometimes you simply need to solve a problem. If something isn’t going as planned, ask yourself how you can fix it. If you can’t fix it yourself, ask for help from someone with the skills or knowledge that you lack. If you assume that the problem isn’t solvable, you may need to try restructuring your exaggerated thinking again.

The third recommendation is to accept what you cannot change. You need to accept the outcome of the situation and move on. Minden explains in the article that practicing acceptance helps you control thoughts that you don’t like.

If you’re a high-achieving professional, you’ll likely benefit from the techniques discussed in the article. Restructuring exaggerations is a great tool for dealing with imposter syndrome. It helps you recognise when you’re not looking at an issue realistically, such as when you’re being overly self-critical.

Accepting that you can’t control everything is another important realisation for leaders and C-level professionals. Accepting what you cannot change helps limit anxieties and insecurities. You learn to rely more on others instead of assuming that you need to fix everything yourself.

These are just a few examples of how to boost confidence and beat imposter syndrome. As the article explains, you need to practice these techniques to notice positive results. So, why not start now? Taking the time to focus on your confidence can prepare you for a brighter future. To learn more about how to build confidence, explore my one-to-one coaching and online courses at https://thinklearnsucceed.com.au.

 

 

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Manage emotions to negotiate successfully

When it comes to negotiations, keeping your emotions in check is essential for a successful outcome. In the article “Managing Your Emotions during a Negotiation”, the author outlines three key points that can help you manage your emotions and achieve success. Most people think of emotions as a hindrance to getting what they want during a negotiation. After all, logic and reason are supposed to be the tools of the trade, right?

The first point is to be aware of your emotions and how they are impacting the negotiation. This can be done by taking a step back and evaluating how you’re feeling at different points during the negotiation. Are you feeling impatient? Frustrated? Anxious? Angry? Once you are aware of your emotions, you can start to manage them better.

The second point is to have a strategy for managing your emotions. This could involve deep breathing exercises, visualisation exercises, or positive self-talk. By having a strategy in place, you’ll be prepared for any emotion that comes up during the negotiation.

The third point is to practice emotional self-control. This means staying calm and composed even when things get tough during the negotiation. Staying in control of your emotions will help you stay focused on the goal of the negotiation and ultimately achieve a successful outcome.

 

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While these tips may seem like common sense, following them can make a big difference in the outcome of a negotiation. Managers, business owners, and supervisors who understand how to use their emotions effectively will be better equipped to get what they want out of negotiations. Understanding your triggers can help you avoid emotional outbursts that could damage negotiations. Managing your energy can help you stay focused and motivated during long negotiations. Staying positive can help keep the mood light and make it easier to reach an agreement. By being aware of your emotions and managing your triggers, and staying in control, you can stay focused and effective, you’ll be more likely to achieve success during negotiations and avoid wasting time on irrelevant discussions.

Find out more in the original article here: https://hbr.org/2021/12/managing-your-emotions-during-a-negotiation

This article summary was created by Eleanor Shakiba

Eleanor is a leadership trainer, success coach and people skills expert. She helps managers and business owners build thriving teams and organisations, using tools from Positive Psychology. She's trained more than 60,000 people during her career as a corporate trainer and professional development consultant. Her mission is inspiring talented people to become leaders who make a difference. 

 

It’s not you, it’s them

Are you mid-career and feeling like you’re not where you want to be? You’re not alone. This article from Harvard Business Review outlines three biases that can hold women back in their careers.

The article discusses three specific types of discrimination: the likability penalty, the confidence gap, and the motherhood penalty. Each affects women differently by either punishing them for their behaviour or penalising them for taking time off. For example, the confidence gap means that due to a lack of confidence, women may not take risks or ask for promotions or raises as much as their male counterparts do. The motherhood penalty points out how after having children, women are often seen as being less capable than men when it comes to job promotions and opportunities. And finally, the likability penalty shows how being too agreeable can lead to mid-career women not getting taken seriously by their colleagues at work.

These types of bias can have a huge impact on mid-career women’s financial success and career progression. It is important for managers, business owners and supervisors to be aware of these biases so they can better understand how they may be affecting their female employees and make changes accordingly. They should create policies which support working mothers and make sure that people’s qualifications rather than gender or behaviour are taken into account when considering promotions or assigning tasks.

 

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How can managers and business owners address these biases? Managers can make an effort to promote gender diversity in their organizations. They can also make sure that there are equal opportunities for advancement for both men and women. Business owners can create policies that support working parents, such as flexible work arrangements and paid parental leave. And everyone can make an effort to give equal weight to the opinions of men and women in meetings and decision-making processes.

These strategies can help to level the playing field for mid-career women, but there is still much work to be done. We need to create workplaces that are free from bias and discrimination. We need to empower mid-career women so they can reach their full potential. Let’s work together to create a brighter future for all women in the workforce.

Find out more in the original article here: https://hbr.org/2022/09/3-workplace-biases-that-derail-mid-career-women?utm_campaign=59d2c81294a32640540086c5&utm_content=632868619fadda00017d851c&utm_medium=smarpshare&utm_source=linkedin

This article summary was created by Eleanor Shakiba

Eleanor is a leadership trainer, success coach and people skills expert. She helps managers and business owners build thriving teams and organisations, using tools from Positive Psychology. She's trained more than 60,000 people during her career as a corporate trainer and professional development consultant. Her mission is inspiring talented people to become leaders who make a difference. 

 

Small rewards (like chocolate) can anchor confidence

Need confidence? Give yourself a chocolate. You’ve probably heard about the benefits of rewards for motivation. A new breakthrough in neuroscience suggests that rewards can also boost confidence. Giving yourself a small reward can train the brain to feel more confident.

A group of researchers published their findings from a recent study on using rewards to manipulate the brain. The researchers wanted to determine if self-confidence can be amplified directly in the brain. They explain that self-confidence is an essential quality to succeed in the modern world. Self-confidence may also help decrease the risk of mental illnesses, such as Alzheimer’s disease and depression.

To complete the study, the researchers developed a unique method for reading and amplifying the brain. The method is called ‘decoded neurofeedback’. It involves mapping specific patterns in the brain linked to an individual’s feelings of confidence. The researchers used this technique to scan the brain and determine whether a participant is experiencing a high or low confidence state.

Participants were unaware of the nature of the study. They were instructed to perform a simple perceptual task. When a high confidence state was detected, the researchers gave the participant a small monetary reward. At the end of the training session, participants were asked to rate their confidence in completing the task. Participants were consistently more confident after receiving the rewards.

Researchers could also reverse the effects. By withholding rewards, they could lower the confidence of the participant. They essentially proved that it’s possible to train the brain to be more confident or less confident with a simple reward system. Keep in mind that the study was limited in scope. The study involved just 17 volunteers. However, it’s in line with the results of similar studies.

Research shows that a reward system helps drive motivation. It can also boost your confidence. If you’re an ambitious professional, your confidence influences career ambitions. Low self-confidence tends to lead to a feeling of inadequacy. You may start to feel unworthy of your job title. We call this imposter syndrome.

Giving yourself small rewards may offer a boost of confidence, but it may not be enough to beat imposter syndrome. To build authentic confidence, you need to get to the root of your insecurities. One solution is to reframe negative thought patterns using the latest neuro-linguistic programming (NLP) techniques.

So, should you start rewarding yourself to increase your confidence? It’s a good start, but you should also explore additional confidence-building methods. For example, a reward may not train the brain to overcome major fears and insecurities. To explore other techniques for a more confident mind, learn about my one-to-one coaching and online courses at https://thinklearnsucceed.com.au.

 

 

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6 ways to think about time… and how they impact your confidence

Does your constant planning keep you from getting anything done in the present? Does your frequent worrying about the past keep you from trying new things? These are examples of how your perspective of time can impact your confidence. Thanks to research published on PsychologyToday.com, you can now gain a better perspective.

Everyone has a different perspective when it comes to the passage of time. Some people are more worried about the past while others focus on the future. According to Rosemary KM Sword and Philip Zimbardo PhD, these differences impact every aspect of your life.

The authors categorise people based on their time perspective. Someone who is ‘past negative’ tends to focus on negative events or thoughts from the past. This may include traumatic events or moments of failure. The negative thoughts tend to keep them from seeing a brighter future.

Someone who is ‘present fatalistic’ is rooted in the present but believes that they’ve got no control over their environment. As with past negative people, present fatalistic people tend to suffer from low self-esteem. They struggle to see their own self-worth. The authors also describe ‘extreme future’ people. This group includes people that are too busy planning to enjoy the present. All three of the time perspectives discussed can limit your opportunities.

So, what’s the best time perspective? The authors argue that the best perspective is balanced. When your time perspective is balanced, you can use your imagination in exciting new ways. You spend less time dwelling on negative thoughts from the past and fears of the future.

The authors used their theories to help treat war veterans suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, balancing your time perspective is beneficial for everyone. Whether you’re more focused on the past, present, or future, your time perspective may be holding you back.

As mentioned in the article, the best perspective is a balanced one. The authors of the article also offer a few examples of how to balance your perspective. If you’re stuck in the past, you need to replace your negative memories with positive ones.

If you’re stuck in the present and feel that you’ve got no control over anything, you may also start to feel like an imposter. Try practicing more self-compassion. Give yourself the freedom to enjoy fun activities and accept yourself for how you are. Several of these suggestions align with common neuro-linguistic programming (NLP) techniques.

Changing the way you think about the past, present, and future could hold the key to your happiness. Your time perspective largely influences your confidence. If you want to learn more about how to beat imposter syndrome, explore my one-to-one coaching and online courses at https://thinklearnsucceed.com.au.

 

 

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